Dear Tom, #FreeBacon

Oh. My. God. Can people just shut the ‘eff up already???

bacon

Bacon is not the devil. Tofu hot dogs are more likely to kill you. Yeah, there, I said it – and I’m speaking as a former vegan!

Here’s an idea! How about~ ALL THINGS IN MODERATION?

You wanna know what made us fat? Low-fat and fat-free. Cutting out all animal products, especially animal fats. Give it up already! Animal fat bad. Monosaturated fat good. Blah-blah-blah. So full of it.

When food producers cut out fat, they replace fat with processed carbohydrates. PROCESSED CARBOHYDRATES. Might as well just shove one spoonful of white sugar after another into your mouth. All day long.

Quit demonizing animal products. You know why we have big brains? Animal protein and animal fat and cooking. (See Richard Wrangham, Catching Fire: How Cooking Made Us Human.)

When white men first encountered the Plains Indians, guess what? Their were struck by their incredible good health and longevity (lack of small pox immunity notwithstanding). The Plains Indians, along with the Eskimos, both of whom traditionally ate a diet based upon fat and fatty meats, did not suffer from any of the white man’s diseases, including tooth decay. No tooth decay. No heart disease. No diabetes. No cancer. No obesity. How do you like those apples? These observations were noted in the literature of the time.

bison

Eskimo diet

Cured meats have been consumed in European countries for centuries – like for a couple thousand years at least. And despite the fact that Europeans smoke more than Americans, they have lower rates of cancer. When we were in France, what did we eat? Cured meats, cheese, foie gras, whole chickens with skin, fatty beef and lamb, duck fat, cream, whole milk, olive oil, olives, meat, pasta, bagettes. We lost weight. Vegetables, you ask? What about vegetables? Not a single restaurant served a salad, let alone a side of vegetables. Oh sure, there were farmer’s markets and we bought vegetables, but even when we ate home cooked meals in the homes of our French hosts, we were served no vegetables except potatoes. And the French are not fat. I did not see a single fat French-person in the countryside. You may have read that obesity is increasing in France. Yes, perhaps, but only in places where the French have replaced their traditional high-fat high meat meals with processed foods- like Americans.

cured meats

If you can find them- and believe me, they are hard to find- studies indicate that while vegans and vegetarians may have a slightly lower risk of cardiovascular disease, they have a slightly higher risk of cancer.

Here’s what I say:

Kale is not the superfood you think it is.

Smoothies are not the answer. For oh-so-many reasons.

Animal fat is not the enemy.

Meat is not the enemy.

Potatoes are not the enemy.

I love milk chocolate and I will not apologize.

Excessive sugar, processed carbohydrates, and polyunsaturated vegetable oils may well be the enemy. As in, avoid low-fat and nonfat diets and foods fried in vegetable oils like the plague they are.

Another read and I cannot recommend this book enough: The Big Fat Surprise, Why Butter, Meat and Cheese Belong in a Healthy Diet, by Nina Teicholz.

The Big Fat Surprise, Why Butter, Meat and Cheese Belong in a Healthy Diet, Nina Teicholz

The Big Fat Surprise, Why Butter, Meat and Cheese Belong in a Healthy Diet, Nina Teicholz

 

 

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17 thoughts on “Dear Tom, #FreeBacon

  1. Alicia Butcher Ehrhardt

    I’ve always been lo-carb if possible – I crave sugar when I’m eating any quantity of it. Lately I’ve been looking for more saturated fat when I get hungry – it seems to work better. But you have to eat a LOT of some things before you get what you need in the saturated fat department. Ever since I realized that, I have stopped eating large amounts of peanuts at a sitting and wondering why.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. juliabarrett Post author

      I actually find I eat less of something if it’s saturated fat, Alicia. Sugar, on the other hand, never satisfies enough. Always want more sugar…

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
      1. juliabarrett Post author

        I love Coke, Ray. Hate Pepsi. Ewww! And like I said, nobody is taking away my milk chocolate. Nobody!

        Like

  2. anny cook

    You said at the beginning…everything in moderation. I grew up on all that stuff and weighed 98 pounds. Now–after slogging through all the bullshit I was advised by my docs? Almost three times that. Slowly fighting it off, one pound at a time. No artificial anything, no fat free, lowfat, blah, blah, blah. No processed food. Everything made at home. Sigh…

    Liked by 1 person

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  3. Marylin Warner

    Brava! Julia, you should be on a talk show–step aside, Dr. Oz–although I think OZ would be absolutely charmed by you.
    When Jim was playing college and competitive basketball and tennis, and later when he was coaching both in h.s. sports, he had endured–and rejected–faulty training and wonder treatments than you’d think humanly possible. For the past 34 years he’s been the calm, certain advocate of “All things in moderation,” and is much happier and healthier than when he was in his late 30s.

    Liked by 1 person

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  4. Roberta

    EXCELLENT, Julia!!!!! Bravo Bravo Bravo!!! We are SO on the same page. Love Teicholz’s book. My Bible! When discussing this topic with friends who eat low fat I always bring up the fact that the Masai eat mostly milk, blood, and meat, or mostly animal foods and have lower heart disease than the low fat countries. And many Eskimos eat more fat than most Americans and live longer than most Americans with healthier hearts too.

    I eat religiously from the four major food groups: salt, sugar, fat, and cholesterol.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. juliabarrett Post author

      Oh, salt is another issue, Roberta! Salt is also demonized. Only certain population groups have issues with sodium. Most people could use more salt.

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      Reply
  5. Diana Stevan

    So true, everything in moderation. That’s the key! As a Home Ec. grad from U of Manitoba, I’ve always followed the Canada Food Guide, which doesn’t suggest leaving out meat. Though I don’t eat a lot of meat, I do eat meat once or twice a week. I prefer poultry, fish and vegetarian entrees. But again, I also enjoy a good steak, pork tenderloin and ribs, corned beef, garlic sausage — now, I’m getting hungry. šŸ™‚ As my daughter (who’s gone through cancer treatment) said when I told her about the latest studies,, “I’m not giving up on bacon, Mom. They’ve tried to scare us before.” I do think it’s the excess of anything that can be a problem. Out of balance, out of whack!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. juliabarrett Post author

      Absolutely, Diana. You have a nutrition background. So do I, so did my mom – she’s a dietician. I wouldn’t say eat meat, or eat anything, three or four times a day, but yeah, everything in moderation. I wish your daughter all the best.

      Liked by 1 person

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